Wednesday, October 31, 2012

HAPPY HALLOWEEN


Grandoe Gloves
Harper's Bazaar October 1956

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

THE PORNOGRAPHY OF VIOLENCE - SIXTIES



short Change Hero ... the Heavy



OZ Magazine NO 10
Cover Art: Martin Sharp
March 1968


Barbarella ... Queen of the Galaxy
Jane Fonda 1968

Monday, October 29, 2012

ANDY WARHOL - ROBERT INDIANA - 1965


Andy

"I was given the same food for twenty years. Soup and sandwiches, and I can tell you, my favourite is Campbell's Tomato Soup. But food takes too much time from my work ..."


Warhol

"Food does not exist for me. I like candies. I could eat candies for breakfast, candies for lunch, candies for dinner ... because they are so good. I also like blood."
Andy Warhol


and


Robert Indiana


"These two pop artists, Andy Warhol and Robert Indiana,in a weird-looking warehouse, downtown, past Wall Street, by the Hudson River, near the docks. One big room to each floor, one big cat to each room."
Ninette Lyon


"The word 'eat' is more than a word. It is a sign you see on every road as you leave the big towns, and signs are important to me. In the eyes of a child, a lighted sign can reflect all the wonders of the world. Besides, the word 'eat' is reassuring, it means not only food, but life."
Robert Indiana

Robert         Andy
Indiana    Warhol
A Second Fame: Good Food
By Ninette Lyon
Vogue March 1965
Photography: Bruce Davidson

Andy Warhol at devodotcom


Sunday, October 28, 2012

ADAM FAITH DOES THE MADISON


ADAM FAITH




A member of the first wave of the British Pop Music scene in the early sixties, Adam Faith was one of Britain's three major pop stars alongside Cliff Richard and Billy Fury.



Adam Faith - Ross Taylor

Adam Faith's producer Ross Taylor, taught him the Madison for  the "Adam Faith Show."


THE STEPS


This is the "Madison Basic" step. The dance, which is done off the beat, has a relaxed knee action, similar to the twist and the kicks should all be from the ankle and not "leg kicks."

     Polly Peck             Susan Small     San-Clair by Berketex

THE PETTICOAT DRESS

       Linzi              Young Jaeger            Harrod's

Once you have grasped the basic steps you will soon pick up the finger snapping, hand clapping, thigh smacking, floor touching variations, which may be called out by a leader as in square dancing.



Everybody's Doing It!
Queen Magazine October, 1962
Photography:Norman Parkinson

News from the sixties at devodotcom

Saturday, October 27, 2012

SHOE ON THIS


ROAMIN' SANDAL
Charles Jourdan

The emerald green snakeskin roman sandal to be worn with day as well as evening clothes. Proof that 'everything old is new again.'


FITS LIKE A GLOVE
Rayne

Slick white patent boot with silver heel, fitting like as second skin. The Look: the long boot with the light summer dress.



GO FISH
Charles Jourdan

Tinsel-heeled acid yellow snakeskin sandal. Diagonally fastened with a big silver saucer button.


A BIRD IN THE HAND
Kurt Geiger

Black patent gold-heeled sandal. T-strap fastened with a square patent buckle.


The Magical Transformation of the Shoe
Queen
March 1970
Photography: Lester Bookbinder

Nicky Haslam's Beatle boot at devodotcom

Thursday, October 25, 2012

RANDOM NOTES - THE SIXTIES


CAROL WHITE
POOR COW

Born in Hammersmith, London in 1943, Carol White was hailed as the "Battersea Bardot," and "the new Julie Christie" entering the sixties as a promising young ingenue with supporting roles in Carry On Teacher, and, as Peter Seller's girlfriend in Never Let Go.

She made the leap to stardom after her lead role in the British Television Drama Cathy Come Home, a BBC television play about homelessness that ranks as the highest placed drama on the list of the British Film Institute's TV 100 of the 20th century.

Taken at the time of her widely critical acclaim, this photograph, by David Bailey, accompanied a story on her star appeal featured in Vogue's "People Are Talking About..." 

Having just completed three films, Poor Cow, opposite Terrance Stamp, I'll Never Forget What's His Name, with Oliver Reed, and The Fixer, along side Alan Bates and Dirk Bogarde, White was hailed as the next "it girl," and one of the most promising female actresses in British cinema during a decade of all things "British" being on the international entertainment world's radar.

Sadly, once Hollywood beckoned, White found fame a hard road to navigate and fell prey to the excesses of the times. Unhappy relationships, and drug and alcohol abuse chipped away at her successes and prompted a downward spiral that caused erratic behaviours that harmed her professionally.

Carol White died in Miami, Florida at the age of 48.


People Are Talking About...
Vogue March, 1968
Photography: David Bailey


Carol White
1943-1991
Once A Great Beauty










Monday, October 22, 2012

COURREGES THE COURAGEOUS


This is the dress that did it...brought arms out in the open. Deeply, drastically. It took a cut of this force to penetrate the lazy women's - "I'll excercise tomorrow."
Courreges was tomorrow - begun today

This was the most beautiful shoulder line ever ... a beautifully carved armhole, slightly cutting away the front of the bodice. The simplicity of a short funnel neckline and a simple shift- shape cut to just above the knee worn over a flat white go-go boot.

It is emblematic of all that was good about sixties fashion.


Courreges was on first.





The perfection of Courreges...the precision...exact proportions,
revolutionary cut, deep - exact shaping with welt seaming.
Flawless beauty in a garment.



The Shuttered Belle...rounded head, tennis ball sunglasses, undershirt shirt, skivvy shirt, large armholes, little white kid hand,  slit-toe shoes... the sixties "Total Look."


Best New Dress...white wool, square neck, low waistline, hip-belted. White with everything - gloves, boots, hat.



Halston was on top: with his hats -  exclusive designs for Bergdorf Goodman as well as editorial designs for the ever-changing needs and whims of fashion editors, Diana Vreeland and Polly Mellen. He was the go-to man for the added touch that completed most of the fashions presented on editorial pages of the sixties. His up-to-the-minute designs lent his imprimatur to every important look that developed up to the time that hair took over as the crowning touch to an outfit. 



Which it would soon do.



Paris: The Look of Courreges
Vogue March 1965
Photography: William Klein

eyes on the sixties at devodotcom

Friday, October 19, 2012

EVERYBODY'S TURNED ON - 1965

The Beatle's in London




NBC's HULLABALOO

People danced... here, the Hullabaloo dancers  get the show off the ground and the caged "go-go" girl, Lada Edmund Jr., awaits her regular closing feature. Youth drank a little and danced a lot. Lemon Gin, rum and coke, a screwdriver (vodka and orange juice) was about as complicated as it got.  Apart from basic beer and basic highballs, there was not a lot of choice at sixties dance venues. 1965 was just at the cusp of marijuana becoming the drink of choice. At this point, everyone under thirty was turned on by Rock N'Roll alone and yet to be under the influence of psychedelics. Marijuana was just being introduced to the mainstream public and had , until now, been an indulgence of the avant-garde, musicians, artists, and adventuresome young millionaires.


The Jerk in Los Angeles


The Frug in Chicago



The Monkey In Atlanta

"The ears of nearly every Time reader everywhere surely have been haunted, horrified or, at least, reached by that pervasive, durable phenomenon known as rock 'n' roll."
A letter from the publisher
Bernhard Auer



A phenomenon large enough to make headlines and definitively determined to be more that just a passing craze, rock 'n' roll makes the cover of Time.

By the 'Summer of Love' two years down the road, the preppy look seen on these pages of Time magazine would pretty much disappear. Hair grew long, everyday clothes became wildly colorful, fabrics were soft, mismatched, and draped with leather and lace touches. Accessories like scarves, hats, boots and vests were wardrobe staples for both sexes and meant to be worn collectively and by either sex. What developed from this point in the mid-sixties was a time of "anything goes" in fashion and in lifestyle.






It just happened...and the music was fantastic

ROCK 'N'ROLL
The Sound of the Sixties
Time Magazine May 1965


eyes on the sixties at devodotcom

Thursday, October 18, 2012

YOUTHQUAKE

YOUTHQUAKE


Virna Lisi
A green-eyed blonde Italian who roars around in a red Maserati, Virna Lisi has, until now, only graced the silver screens of Europe. This year she stars opposite Jack Lemmon in her first American film, How to Murder Your Wife.


Dionne Warwick

At twenty-four, Whitney Houston's aunt Dionne Warwick, was known in France as "la lionne d'East Orange,"New Jersey. A lioness, lionized, she had played the Olympia in Paris, the Palladium in London, been mobbed, headlined and screamed over. With hit records including "Walk On By" and "Reach Out For Me,"  she is soon to become a  big name in big places here in America.

YOUTHQUAKERS
Whose On Next


Marisa Berenson
Eighteen year-old Marisa Schiaparelli Berenson lives in Switzerland, skis a lot and paints. She is wild about dancing, clothes, and a career as a model.


Marisa Berenson became a famous fashion model 
 ... and is still beautiful at sixty-five


Pilar Crespi

Thirteen year-old Pilar Crespi,studies in four languages. Dreams of a country life with a gentleman companion and at least four children. She adores being a girl.


Eight years later,Pilar Crespi marries that country gentleman, Gabriel Echavarria, son of a diplomat and one of the first families of Colombia. The wedding - a country wedding in Italy, took place in a twelfth century castle. 

The beautiful young couple lived happily ever after ... for a while



Now a philanthropist, Pilar and husband Stephen Robert, are the founders of Source of Hope.  Her present country life is in New York City.



Heidi Murray Vanderbilt

At sixteen,she is what she wants to be: an acting actress. Six years later she married Jones Harris, a freelance investigative reporter and son of the producer Jed Harris and actress Ruth Gordon.


Stella Astor

The daughter of Sir John Jacob Astor, fifteen and a smasher - very white skin, splash of gold-brown hair, eyes the colour of green grapes ripening. Two dreams: to pass her exams with some glory , to look like Jean Shrimpton. 



      COVER
     GIRL
     JEAN
SHRIMPTON

most would...


YOUTHQUAKE

There is a marvellous moment that starts at thirteen and wastes no time. No Longer waits to grow up, but makes its own way, its own look by the end of the week. Gone is the once-upon-a-daydream world. The dreams, still there, break into action: writing, singing, acting, designing. Youth, warm and gay as a kitten yet self-sufficient as James Bond, is surprising countries east and west with a sense of assurance serene beyond all years.

The year's in its youth, the youth in its year.
Youthquake 1965

"very" Diana Vreeland



#1 Hit song in 1965


1965 PREDICTIONS

The Year of the Body
Photographs by Irving Penn


THE BODYSTOCKING


Revealing, concealing, enclosing the body from neck to foot ...


Small-jacket Suit - Peak of Precision



SUIT - HAT - GLOVES
end of an era ...




STRAPPING SHOE


VINYL
GO GO BOOTS


THE SKIMP COAT
GO GO BOOTS


SUEDE
GO GO BOOTS


THE FRENCH CURL


THE SCARFED HEAD
BY HALSTON



YOUTHQUAKE FASHION


I remember like it was today, my mother coming home from a buying trip to Europe and taking me into the bathroom to cut my bangs just so. the idea was to create a graduated fringe low over the eyes and dropping mid-ear to create a frame for the face. She had seen the look on Elizabeth Taylor while in London and decided it was perfect for me. Along with the new 'do,' was a wonderful crayon yellow, white and navy chevron striped vinyl mini skirt (wish I had kept it,) Beatle jackets for my brothers - grey, collarless with black piping, and pairs of Mary Quant flowered white pantyhose like those above by Beautiful Bryans. These were all the rage in Europe. Unfortunately, my un-Twiggy-like legs just never could rock this look - a look best left to long and leggy skinny girls which, try as I may, I was not going to become. 

I wisely stuck to the black version.


Paula Feiten

A poster-girl for the original 'London Look,' Ford model Paula Feiten was big on the pages of seventeen magazine and other popular fashion magazines of the sixties. A blonde version of the successful teen model Colleen Corby, both shared a similar pout and winsome look that was in demand after the arrival of Twiggy and her success on the international fashion stage. Feiten and Corby came to epitomize the new, young, mod look that was revolutionizing American fashion.




Youthquake
Predictions 1965
Vogue January 1965
Photography:
Gianni Penati 
Irving Penn
Leombruno-Bodi


I got you babe ...devodotcom